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Etta James - Who´s Blue? Rare Chess 1960s-1970s...
15,95 €
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(1960-76 ´Chess´) (67:49/24) In the annals of R&B’s great unsung heroines, you won’t find Etta James. Nobody’s idea of an underdog, she recorded prolifically for over 50 years and can hardly be said to have toiled in obscurity. Etta grabbed the spotlight as a teenager with her first recording, ‘Roll With Me Henry’, and went from strength to strength from there, cruising into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame early and winning her most recent Grammy in the 21st century. Inarguably her most successful work, both commercially and artistically, was unleashed during her 15-year tenure with Chicago’s fabled Chess Records, where she rolled out a decade-long string of hits and a dozen LPs. ´Who’s Blue? Rare Chess Recordings of the 60s and 70s´ eschews the many big hits that have been endlessly anthologised, instead cherry-picking an eclectic selection of B-sides and album cuts, 18 of which make their digital debut and one that’s never been released anywhere. Is there anything better than discovering new treasures sung by a superstar icon at the peak of her powers? Recorded in a variety of locales (Chicago, Muscle Shoals, Nashville, Los Angeles, even New Jersey) the tracks herein showcase Etta’s artistry in a broad variety of styles. Her stock-in-trade blues shouting comes to the fore on a couple of Willie Dixon-penned barn-burners, ‘Nobody But You’ and ‘Fire’, while she indulges her passion for smooth jazzy crooning on ‘It Could Happen To You’ and ‘I Worry About You’. She tackles 70s-style rock on ‘Only A Fool’ and offers a few country standards, most notably a sublime reading of Mickey Newbury’s ‘Sweet Memories’ and a surprising take on Don Gibson’s ‘Look Who’s Blue’. Of course, Etta James is primarily (and rightfully) revered as a towering figure in the pantheon of 60s soul, and there’s no shortage of that here, from the funky drive of ‘Take Out Some Insurance’ and the swaggering riposte of ‘(I Don’t Need Nobody To Tell Me) How To Treat My Man’ to the searing deep soul of ‘My Man Is Together’, the frisky scatting on ‘You Can Count On Me’ and the Berry Gordy-penned rocker ‘Seven Day Fool’. And speaking of songwriters, there’s a 1970 remake of ‘What Fools We Mortals Be’, a song Etta had recorded in 1956 from the pen of her mother, the notorious Dorothy Hawkins. A vault find seeing light for the first time anywhere, ‘Can’t Shake It’ finds Etta romping through a girl-group-styled workout, and you can almost hear the smile on her face. Another highlight is ‘That Man Belongs Back Here With Me’, a missed opportunity for a hit single if ever there was one. As is ‘Do Right’. Actually, ‘Street Of Tears’, ‘You’re The Fool’ and ‘Let Me Know’ would sound right at home on any ´Best of Etta´ collection as well. That’s the wonderful thing about ´Who’s Blue?. It’s not Etta James’ ´Greatest Hits´. It just sounds like it could be. By Dennis Garvey ´

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 21.06.2019
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Various - Sun Country Collection - Memphis Ramb...
24,95 € *
zzgl. 3,99 € Versand

(1990/Rhino) At Sun Records on 706 Union Avenue in Memphis, wild rockabilly and polite country were part of the same continuum, as surely as Saturday nights rolled into Sunday mornings. In either category, genius producer Sam Phillips invariably sought out un-encumbered, passionate, plainly stated perform-ances. He wanted a mood to establish itself the second a song began and then intensify and ignite. Phillips´ Nashville contemporaries were adding scads of strings and busloads of back-up singers to sweeten songs for the uptown crowd, but Phillips sensed that frankness was gaining an edge over forced sophistication. Phillips arrived at this method partly by ingenuity and partly by necessity—after all, fewer musicians on a session meant fewer people to pay. But from the start, Phillips was also searching for something novel. Phillips, an Alabaman, moved to Memphis in 1944 for a disk jockey spot at WREC. In 1949 and 1950, he put together a makeshift recording studio in what was previously a Union Avenue radiator shop. In his first step toward greatness, Phillips began record-ing local performers and leasing the witty, angular sides to labels like Chess and Modern. By the end of 1951, thanks to the success of Jackie Brenston´s rock ´n´ roll forerunner ´Rocket 887 Phillips was able to quit WREC and concentrate on building his own label, Sun Records. With vital blues and R&B performers like Rufus Thomas, Howlin´ Wolf, and Junior Parker in his stable, Phillips over-saw the finest electric blues from outside Chicago being made at the time. Phillips´ breakthrough approach, unquenched emotion drenched in echo, resulted in a tidal wave of raw, early recordings that still startle. Yet Phillips´ ambitions ranged beyond what he heard in the blues, and the natural next step for him was to find the points of intersection between the blues and country and western. Many of the lasting performers on Sun Country Volume One are singer/guitarists without full-blown bands. Most of the recordings are based around voice and acoustic six-string, and in some cases that´s the whole arrangement: Howard Seratt´s ´Make Room In The Lifeboat For Me,´ country gospel worthy of the dread-drenched Louvin Brothers, features only the haunted singer´s guitar and harmonica. Even on uptempo tunes, Phillips saw to it that drums were used sparingly, the idea was to flip convention and let the song drive the band. Because there were fewer players to shift around, Phillips and his flock could experiment with different treatments of the same tune. Radically dissimilar takes of Warren Smith´s ´So Long I´m Gone´ serve as bookends to Sun Country Volume One and go a long way toward telling the grand story of how country spawned rockabilly. The words are the same in both Charlie Feathers but the attitudes couldn´t be farther apart. Smith is best known as a post-Presley rocker (his raucous calling cards are ´Rock And Roll Ruby´ and the tasteless ´Ubangi Stomp´), but the country take of ´So Long I´m Gone´ that kicks off this set fore-shadows his move into straight C&W after he left Sun. On this slow version, Smith collapses into regret, missing the occasional guitar strum, mortified that he has to leave his philandering lover. The fast rockabilly variation that slams this record shut is triumphant, the sound of a hardened man deter-mined to beat adversity. He´s out the door, he´s bound for glory. The fast ´So Long I´m Gone´ sounds like freedom. Throughout Sun Country Volume One are land-marks of Sam Phillips´ move from invigorating standard country forms to exploring a new type of country he helped invent. A key part of the journey takes place during ´My Rind Of Carryin´ On:´ recorded by future insurance salesman Doug Poindexter and the Starlite Wranglers. The Wranglers were legend-ary Elvis accomplices Scotty Moore on guitar and Bill Black on bass, the duo had already begun rehearsing with Presley when this was recorded in May 1954. Poindexter isn´t much of a singer (his delivery makes it seem as if he was unaware of the lyrics´ risque innuendoes), but we can hear the seeds of Moore´s imminent breakthrough with Presley in his brief solo bursts. It´s history, to be sure, but it´s also ferocious in its own right. Sun Country Volume One is full of these magical moments, none of which have appeared on any previous Rhino collection. (Completists may wish to discover Bear Family´s massive The Sun Country Years 11-LP box set, which tells the whole story.) Sun´s big names are

Anbieter: Bear Family Recor...
Stand: 18.06.2019
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